Regional Goals

Regional goals reflect commitments made at the regional level toward specific quantitative outcomes. Some are the result of requirements set by federal agencies, the legislature, or by state or regional groups. Others are voluntary agreed-upon commitments that help push the region towards a better quality of life.

Regional indicators help track progress towards various goals.

Goal: 
Demonstrate increase in petroleum reduction by local fleets by 15% year-over-year.

 

The national Clean Cities program, part of the US Department of Energy, has an overall goal of saving 2.5 billion gallons of petroleum per year by 2020. In order to meet this goal, DOE has tasked each local coalition with decreasing their petroleum consumption by 15% annually.  Clean Cities was created out of the Energy Policy Act to provide technical, informational, and financial resources to fleets that adopt alternative fuels and vehicles. 

Goal: 
Achieve a voluntary goal of 140 gallons per capita daily (gpcd) for municipal water use.

 

Region C's Water Conservation Implementation Task Force suggests a voluntary goal of 140 gallons per capita daily (gpcd) as a threshold for conservation measures in the 2016 Region C Water Plan. According to 2012 Water for Texas State Water Plan, Region C will be responsible for 44 percent of the recommended municipal water conservation in the state by 2060. The Region C Water Planning Group continues to place strong emphasis on water conservation and reuse as a means of meeting projected water needs in the region. 

Progress/Status
10% Complete
Goal: 
Reduce electric consumption by at least 5% each year for 10 years, applicable only to ozone non-attainment areas.

 

Senate Bill 898 mandates energy efficiency programs in political subdivisions, institutions of high education, and state agency facilities located in non-attainment counties in Texas.  The mandate is located in the Texas Health and Safety Code Section 388.005.  Each political subdivision, institution of higher education, or state agency in affected counties is required to:

Goal: 
Reduce energy and water intensity of buildings by 20% each.

 

The City of Fort Worth has committed to the Better Buildings Challenge, setting a goal of a 20% reduction in both energy and water intensity of buildings over ten years.  The City pledged 20 million square feet to energy intensity reduction goals and 5.7 million square feet to water intensity reduction.

Progress/Status
80% Complete
Goal: 
Reduce energy usage by 50% for existing infrastructure and to carbon neutral for new infrastructure.

 

The Dallas 2030 District has set energy reduction goals for the 27 million committed square feet within Dallas.  For existing buildings, the goal is a minimum 20% reduction below the national average by 2020, with incremental targets, reaching a 50% reduction by 2030.  For new buildings, major renovations, and new infrastructure, the goal is an immediate 60% reduction below the national average, with incremental targets, reaching carbon neutral by 2030.

 

Goal: 
Reduce water usage for existing buildings/operations as well as new buildings/infrastructure by 50%.

 

The Dallas 2030 District has set water reduction goals for the 27 million committed square feet within Dallas.  For existing buildings, the goal is a minimum 20% reduction below the current district average by 2020, with incremental targets, reaching a 50% reduction by 2030.  For new buildings, major renovations, and new infrastructure, the goal is an immediate 50% reduction below the current district average.

 

Goal: 
Reduce transportation CO2 emissions for existing and new infrastructure by 50%.

 

The Dallas 2030 District has set transportation CO2 emission reduction goals for existing and new infrastructure.  For existing infrastructure, the goal is a minimum 20% reduction below the current district average by 2020, with incremental targets, reaching a 50% reduction by 2030.  For new infrastructure, major renovations, and new infrastructure, the goal is an immediate 50% reduction below the current district average with incremental targets, reaching carbon neutral by 2030.